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Does My Child Have a Learning Disorder?
(ADD, ADHD and other disorders)

Questions to Ask Yourself

  1. Has my child been prescribed medication to help manage their behavior in school?
  2. Does my child struggle in school and with homework despite obvious intelligence? Is my child's disruptive or destructive behavior distracting me or the teacher from truly enjoying and cherishing our time with them?
  3. Does my child have trouble sitting still? 
  4. Does my child only sit still or seem engaged when using media like video games and television?
  5. Does my child regularly use repetitive motions like rocking back and forth or side to side?
  6. Does my child only like to eat simple carbohydrate and refined sugar foods like pizza, macaroni and cheese, grilled cheese, cereal and french fries?
  7. Do my child's eyes seem to not be in sync (one eye lazy or moving differently than the other)?
  8. Was my child's birthing process abnormally stressful?  Was there distress, an emergency C-section, depression, or were forceps used?  How old was my child when he/she crawled/walked/spoke simple sentences?

Answers to Your Questions

1.  Has my child been prescribed medication to help manage their behavior in school?

If a child has been prescribed drugs to control the symptoms of ADD & ADHD then your child obviously has some brain imbalances.  What many people are not aware of is that there are drug free methods to treat brain imbalances and help children not just control the symptoms of ADD or ADHD but to change brain function.  The Visagraph is a powerful assessment tool in monitoring what the eyes are doing when reading.  The information attained can help a doctor assess what is happening in the child's brain.
The next step may include the Interactive Metronome, which is a program that engages a child in such a way as to change and enhance brain function.  Lifestyle and nutritional changes as well as treatment by a chiropractic neurologist can help a child change brain function and begin to lead a normal, drug-free life.  It can also help a parent get their life back in the form of a healthy, happy and well-functioning child.

2.  Does my child struggle in school and with homework despite obvious intelligence? Is my child's disruptive or destructive behavior distracting me or the teacher from truly enjoying and cherishing our time with them?

When a child's processing centers are not working properly the child often becomes inattentive, off-task, disruptive, uncooperative, and or restless.  A child with learning challenges often needs a high level of stimulation to remain engaged and when the teacher or a parent does not engage them they may find unproductive outlets for their energy.  Changes can be made in a child's life that will help them be more of their true, wonderful self. 

3.  Does my child have trouble sitting still? 

Restlessness is generally a sign of a child's mind being very active.  In fact, the child's mind may go so fast that it impacts the child's ability to comprehend.  When this happens, a child often experiences some kind of "boredom". Children with learning challenges commonly cannot follow information that is being presented to them, yet they are very bright.  When a child's processing centers are not working well they find something to do that is more interesting than listening, often becoming inattentive, off-task, disruptive, uncooperative, and or restless. They may not only have processing challenges, but they may also have a motor system that is not being inhibited as it should and thus movement seems to never end. When you see this kind of restlessness, especially when accompanied by other learning challenges, then an evaluation is appropriate to assess brain processing.

4.  Does my child only sit still or seem engaged when using media like video games and television?

Media stimulates the parts of a child's brain that allows them to focus.  The downside is that watching television and playing video games can create brain imbalances. Children are now reportedly engaging in between 5-8 hours per day of media. Subsequently, they are largely deprived from creative play and exercise. Movement through exercise is one of the most powerful daily activities to develop brain.  Exercise is critical for all children and especially for those with learning challenges.

5.  Does my child regularly use repetitive motions like rocking back and forth or side to side?

Children use repetitive motions to give themselves a sense of focus or calm.  These movements provide vestibular stimulation.  This is definitely a sign of a brain imbalance and should be addressed.

6.  Does my child only like to eat simple carbohydrate and refined sugar foods like pizza, macaroni and cheese, grilled cheese, cereal and french fries?

Children with learning disabilities often crave these foods because of the way their brain responds.  Fast-burning carbohydrates are high in sugar and have very little nutritional value, but they can create an opiate response in the brain.  A child gets a kind of "high" when eating these foods that may allow them to focus for a short while before they crash from the "high."  Nutritious meals and other interventions are appropriate.  If your child seems to fit this description, inquire about our "Foods for Kids Class" and other programs offered to help manage these challenges.

7.  Do my child's eyes seem to not be in sync (one eye lazy or moving differently than the other)?

Improper ocular function or eye movement and muscle strength are direct signs that there is a problem with brain integration.  There are treatments that can improve both the eye function and thus the brain function resulting in more balanced behavior and capacity to learn.

8.  Was my child's birthing process abnormally stressful?  Was there distress, an emergency C-section, depression, or were forceps used?  How old was my child when he/she crawled/walked/spoke simple sentences?

Many children with learning challenges had a stressful birthing process.
Studies show that children with learning challenges often had some form of distress, either in the womb or during the birthing distress.  If a mother suffered depression or had a substance problem during pregnancy, had an emergency C-section, required the use of suction and or forceps, or gave birth prematurely these things can have an effect on an infant's developing brain.  If one of these scenarios describe your child's birthing process, then it may be appropriate to seek help and see what can be done to help your child maintain healthy and normal brain function. 

Studies indicate that crawling is integral in brain development. When babies crawl it is a powerful tool in developing the brain because the cross movement between the arms and legs sends stimulation to the developing brain.  Walking too soon or too late can indicate brain imbalances that need to be addressed.  Language development (a child should be speaking simple sentences at 24 months) is also a sign of brain function and should be assessed.

Explore the World of Solutions
For ADD, ADHD & Learning Disorders at the Sonoma County Learning Enhancement Center.

Finally, real Help and Hope for people suffering from learning disorders.

Join us for an informative and interactive tour of
The Sonoma County Learning Enhancement Center.
Together we will explore drug-free solutions to
today's toughest learning challenges.

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